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vintageanchorbooks:

Yoga Poses for Writers
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"

There are lots of theories about Nobel “bias”, few of them involving the possibility that writers from non-English speaking countries, many of whom readers in the west have neither read nor heard of, might actually be quite good.

The Royal Swedish Academy’s appointed judges themselves say they don’t like the effects of the creative writing school battery farms on the New York publishing scene. More widely, the Nobel is seen as the perfect platform from which to counter US cultural hegemony; and there’s a notion that the snobbish Nobel judges don’t like to reward authors who actually sell.

New York Times book critic Dwight Garner rightly pointed out the other day that the judges’ blind spot in literature tends to be laughs – since they travel least well between cultures – but there’s one unexplored possibility: that the judges are, in fact, being extremely funny, albeit in the Swedish style, basing their choice around a single annual provocation: getting Philip Roth to say something about his perpetual failure to win.

"

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/emma-brockes-column/2014/oct/09/patrick-modiano-nobel-prize-literature-prize-philip-roth-loser

Burn!

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I had this recollection after looking at a picture of my old dog Toffee. She came into our lives 10 years ago. She was a stray and I made friends with her. Our other dog, Jojo, loved playing with her. Toffee used to hang out in our garden, we would feed her and were on the fence about adopting her. One day she vanished and reappeared 48 hours later. She was, as my dad put it, “Walking like a drunkard”. It also looked like she was missing a patch of fur around the stomach area. My dad immediately decided against adopting her because she “seemed to have some kind of skin disease”. Upon closer inspection, the patch was a perfect rectangle and it looked like her fur had been shaved off. My mom was convinced that “some cruel and evil people had used her for a black magic ritual”. Since I was of the opinion that parents were wrong most of the time, I took a closer look at her. There was a tiny cut in her stomach and one of her ears had been clipped. The city corporation, as part of the Animal Birth Control program, marks spayed and neutered dogs by clipping off a small portion of the tip of the ear. I looked at Toffee and asked her, “Who fixed you?”. She wagged her tail and gave me this look that said, “Well done human!”. The vet confirmed my suspicion the next day.

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ifpaintingscouldtext:

Rene Magritte | The Double Secret | 1927 

ifpaintingscouldtext:

Rene Magritte | The Double Secret | 1927 

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humansofnewyork:

I think a wonderful symbol of the Tibetan culture is the behavior of the stray dogs around their monastery. Most everywhere else I’ve traveled, stray dogs have been very skittish around humans. Here, they seemed right at home.
(Dharamshala, India)

I just love this series on India.

humansofnewyork:

I think a wonderful symbol of the Tibetan culture is the behavior of the stray dogs around their monastery. Most everywhere else I’ve traveled, stray dogs have been very skittish around humans. Here, they seemed right at home.

(Dharamshala, India)

I just love this series on India.

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My spirit animal.

My spirit animal.

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via petervidani)

Photoset

skunkbear:

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Klari Reis

From A Catolog of 365 Petri Dishes

I’m a big fan of multiculturalism.

(via npr)

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kinoyoga:

One of the things that I love the most is when a student gets the inspiration to practice and follows it. Check out @mattexp here binding his hands and feet in Supta Kurmasana! When he was in our retreat in Thailand our assistants said his muscles were too big to put in this posture. His practice just goes to show that when you put in the work you get the results. It doesn’t matter what size, shape, gender or nationality you are, it just matters that you show up on your mat every day. Never give up, but never force. Turn up with presence and love on your mat, work with technique and alignment, give the body and mind space to open and then wait for it while being open to receiver it. What posture are you working on in the practice now? Thanks to Giuliano and everyone at Ashtanga Yoga Bologna for an awesome weekend! I’ll be back soon either for teaching or to grab some of those amazing green Italian figs.  (at ASHTANGA YOGA BOLOGNA - AYBO)

I love this pose so much. In some ways it is my nemesis because it makes me claustrophobic, but once I’m done holding it I feel like a tremendous weight has been lifted off my chest.

kinoyoga:

One of the things that I love the most is when a student gets the inspiration to practice and follows it. Check out @mattexp here binding his hands and feet in Supta Kurmasana! When he was in our retreat in Thailand our assistants said his muscles were too big to put in this posture. His practice just goes to show that when you put in the work you get the results. It doesn’t matter what size, shape, gender or nationality you are, it just matters that you show up on your mat every day. Never give up, but never force. Turn up with presence and love on your mat, work with technique and alignment, give the body and mind space to open and then wait for it while being open to receiver it. What posture are you working on in the practice now? Thanks to Giuliano and everyone at Ashtanga Yoga Bologna for an awesome weekend! I’ll be back soon either for teaching or to grab some of those amazing green Italian figs. (at ASHTANGA YOGA BOLOGNA - AYBO)

I love this pose so much. In some ways it is my nemesis because it makes me claustrophobic, but once I’m done holding it I feel like a tremendous weight has been lifted off my chest.

Quote
"If you shave your head the new hair that grows back will be straighter. So if you shave your head five or six times, you’ll get really straight hair."

— If I had a Dollar for every Indian person who said this to me, I’d have a house in the Hamptons by now.

Chat

Interview with Maryam Mirzakhani, the brilliant Iranian mathematician who was the first woman to win the Fields Medal

  • Interviewer: What advice would you give lay persons who would
  • like to know more about mathematics—what it is,
  • what its role in our society has been and so on?
  • What should they read? How should they proceed?
  • Dr. Mirzakhani: This is a difficult question. I don’t think that everyone
  • should become a mathematician, but I do believe that
  • many students don’t give mathematics a real chance.
  • I did poorly in math for a couple of years in middle
  • school; I was just not interested in thinking about it.
  • I can see that without being excited mathematics can
  • look pointless and cold. The beauty of mathematics
  • only shows itself to more patient followers.